Chiropractic Research

 

Numerous studies have shown the effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of chiropractic treatment. The following are excerpts from just a few of the more recent studies.

 

 

For Low Back Pain

The American College of Physicians published guidelines in 2007 recommending spinal manipulation as the only non-drug treatment with proven effectiveness for acute low back pain. Supervised and home exercise therapies were not found effective for acute low back pain.

 

-Chou R, Qaseem A et al (2007) Annals of Internal Medicine

 

The UK Back Pain Exercise and Manipulation (BEAM) Trial published by the British Medical Journal reports that there is good evidence that chiropractic management of back pain produces superior results in terms of safety, effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and patient satisfaction.

 

-UK Beam Randomized Trial (2004) British Medical Journal

 

"Patients with chronic low back pain treated by chiropractors showed greater improvement and satisfaction at one month than patients treated by family physicians. Satisfaction scores were higher for chiropractic patients. A higher proportion of chiropractic patients (56 percent vs. 13 percent) reported that their low back pain was better or much better, whereas nearly one-third of medical patients reported their low back pain worse or much worse."

 

-Nyiendo et al (2000) Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics

 

 

For Neck Pain and Headache

A research study from the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Bristol examined 100 patients with chronic neck pain from car accident whiplash injuries who were referred for chiropractic treatment. They concluded that "chiropractic is the only proven effective treatment" for patients with these chronic problems.

 

-U.K. Khan et al (1999) Journal of Orthopaedic Medicine

 

Duke University researchers did a review of headache treatment options and concluded that spinal manipulation resulted in almost immediate improvement for cervicogenic headaches (those that originate in the neck). They also found that spinal manipulation had significantly fewer side effects and longer-lasting relief of tension-type headaches compared to amitriptyline (a commonly prescribed headache medication).

 

-McClory, Penzien, Hasselblad, Gray (2001) Duke Evidence Report

 

 

For Disc Herniation

Patients with MRI documented and symptomatic cervical and lumbar disc herniations were evaluated and referred for chiropractic treatment. The study found that 80% of the patients had a good clinical outcome with reduced pain scores below 2/10. In addition, 63% of the patients showed a reduced or completely resorbed disc herniation on repeat MRI. 78% of the patients were able to return to work in their predisability occupations.

 

-BenEliyahu DJ (1996) Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics